Perkin’s Peak In Snow

Just before Jonas was due to leave, we were promised two days of good weather and we decided to try and tackle Perkin’s Peak in the snow.  (This view seen from my yard.). It is not far, but it takes about two hours to reach the tree line.The snow level was reasonably high and the burned areas were free of it.  Lakes previously hidden were now very visible.We hit snow right around the tree line.  Perkin’s Peak behind.For the first time, I had taken my atv along.  Jonas found it so uncomfortable to ride on the back after a while that he elected to walk.The small lake beneath the peaks was not yet frozen.The mine road goes higher, but it is steep and the drifts were erratic so this is where I stopped.I hiked on a little further – this next shot taken by Jonas. I dressed for the ride; it was so hot I was grossly overdressed for hiking!He went on ahead but had only well-ventilated summer shoes so I advised him not to try for the summit.  There is no trail and the snow would be very slippery on the loose boulders.  He is using a stick he carved himself to aid his walking.

I was content to hike over to where I could see the Chilcotin plateau.  My place is under the fog bank; the snow-covered Itchas look like clouds floating above it.Part of the fire site.Looking south.  What a spectacular day – especially after 2 months of gloomy smoke and cloud.Their are trails to two mines – previously, travelling on foot, I have been to only one on a day trip.  With the atv we could now visit both.  Remnants of dwarf birch still had a bit of red colour.The trail took us past the remnants of the miner’s cabin.  I wonder how many months of the year he stayed up there.Close to the end of the trail.The mine was blown up to avoid people injuring themselves.  The only sign is the spoil heap, on which Jonas is walking.  (Harry thinks he is crazy.)Even the journey home was gorgeous.  The weather deteriorated again the next day – how lucky we were to catch this glorious window of sun and snow.

About wilderness dweller

I have lived for more than 30 years as a Wilderness Dweller. Most of that time was in cabins I built myself far from the nearest road, high in the mountains of British Columbia, Canada. My "retirement" home is accessible by a bush road but still far from neighbours. I live off the grid, and operate this blog by solar-powered satellite internet.
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