Farewell Nuk Tessli

I have already mentioned some of the changes that have been happening at Nuk Tessli.  The motor boat made moving canoes and other objects much easier.

Many years ago, a young German was writing his experiences in my guest book and he asked me if he could use the word “Queendom.”  I thought it a wonderful word!  (The final Nuk Tessli book, already half-written, will be called just that!)  Doron is installing compost toilets for each cabin.  So finally, just before I had to leave, I had a throne.

Doron also has started a shower block.  What a different job carrying logs is with several people – I built the first 2 cabins at Nuk Tessli totally alone.  I dragged and lifted the logs with a block and tackle and a come-along.

But to me, the most amazing thing at Nuk Tessli was the installation of a router so that we had Wi-Fi.  I never really had a phone of any kind – now, every morning and evening, several people can call or text Israel at once.

I like this toy so much I think I will get one for Ginty Creek so my world wide volunteers can phone home.

And so the last day dawned.  How many thousands of pictures of the sunrise have I taken at Nuk Tessli over the last 24 years?

I managed to persuade the Israelis to line up for a photo.

On the left (pulling faces) is Pish, then Amotz, Me and Doron, Doron’s wife, Suzan, Inbal and Oren.

I am handing over the keys to Nuk Tessli

Things got a little emotional after that so I never got around to taking any more photos until we were in the air.

Farewell Nuk Tessli (It is kind of smokey due to a forest fire about 200 miles south.)  The cabins are near the islands on the extreme left of the lake.

A few days before I left, I celebrated my 65th birthday.  So I guess I am now officially retired.

 

About wilderness dweller

I have lived for more than 30 years as a Wilderness Dweller. Most of that time was in cabins I built myself far from the nearest road, high in the mountains of British Columbia, Canada. My "retirement" home is accessible by a bush road but still far from neighbours. I live off the grid, and operate this blog by solar-powered satellite internet.
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7 Responses to Farewell Nuk Tessli

  1. Barb Hemphill says:

    Hey Chris, Congrats on reaching 65 and retiring. My turn next month. ! I am sure you are quite sad to leave your queendom, I am sad knowing it is not yours anymore, but you must feel incredible satisfaction for everything you accomplished and all the wonderful friends you made along the way. Gintly Creek is another whole new chapter in your amazing lifestyle……looking forward to reading your blogs and the pictures too.
    La Chaim !

  2. Monika says:

    I got tears in my eyes Chris. You’ve worked incredibly hard and it is such an amazingly beautiful place. You are hero to me in so many ways. Never mind the tough stuff…you just keep on going. I admire that in you. Are you happy about this move you’ve been making? I mean you lived there for so long. Which place do you like better?
    Monika

  3. Toni Reimer says:

    Me too, I can remember reading your struggles with a horse and walking through the
    forest just to get to what you finally called Nuk Tessli when it was built. Rain and muck
    and cutting down trees, such a lot of work. You’ve earned your retirement but of course it’s just a new beginning. I look forward to your next books.

    Good luck with wherever you go from here. Toni

  4. Lynn McArthur says:

    Chris, I too echo the sentiments of Sherry and Pam…have followed you through your 24 years at Nuk Tessli and enjoyed my visit there, and had a great lump in my throat as I read this. I don’t believe for a moment that you’ll be retired…you’re just beginning a new journey. Many blessings on your future. Can’t wait for the new books to come!

  5. Gregg Cameron says:

    Since having the privilege of spending a few days in your Queendom I have read your books and followed your blog religiously. Partly out of envy of the amazing place you lived in and partly out of admiration for the courage and ingenuity you have demonstrated! I have even developed a greater appreciation for the plant life you photograph and describe.

    I hope you will continue to maintain a blog about Ginty Creek, your writing and photography are fantastic.

  6. Pam Mayhew says:

    Chris – Happy 65th birthday, belatedly. Read this with tears in my eyes too, Nuk Tessli was your creation, so much hard work put into building it, even tho a labour of love. I remember reading about your incredible determination to construct those cabins, log by log, by yourself. Letting go can be heartwrenching, but I can’t see you ever being “retired” from life.

  7. Sherry says:

    Chris, I got tears in my eyes reading this last post! I have all your books and have read them each several times, so I know how much work it was for you to build Nuk Tessli into what it is today. Looking forward to your two new books!

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